A smart grid is a transactive grid.
- Lynne Kiesling
Archive for July, 2010

A Smart Water Grid?

Via Planet Green, a detailed overview of how a smart grid for water may evolve and what it may comprise.  As the article notes: “…The saying goes, “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it.” Knowing this, and knowing that we have a water crisis on our hands, why do we not have a […]

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Are Smart Grids Without Consumer Motivation Really A Smart Idea?

Via Master Resource, a detailed and spirited analysis of smart meters and smart grids.  As the article notes: “…Any reader lucky enough to have a new iPhone4 knows that sometimes technology just doesn’t work out the way sellers claim. Other times they do, but not in the way that consumers want or expect. Such is […]

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Smart Meter Chaos in Maryland – Consumers, Anyone?

Via Master Resource, an interesting and spirited look at another smart meter debacle, again due to the lack of consideration of consumers.  As the report notes, smart meters are “…all about government (taxpayer) and class ratepayer subsidies, not stand-alone economics between willing buyers and sellers…”  Hmm…could a transactive grid with real market incentives actually help […]

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Utilities: Transforming Their Core Business From Distribution To Connection

Via SmartGrid News, an interesting article on the need for utilities to transform their core business from that of distribution to one of connection, and the recognition that energy utilities will no longer be selling kilowatts any more than AT&T sells megabytes. Rather, as the article notes, “…they’ll be selling convenience, lifestyle, improved service quality […]

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About This Blog And Its Authors
Grid Unlocked is powered by two eco-preneurs who analyze and reference articles, reports, and interviews that can help unlock the nascent, complex and expanding linkages between smart meters, smart grids, and above all: smart markets.

Based on decades of experience and interest in conservation, Monty Simus and Jamie Workman believe that a truly “smart” grid must be a “transactive” grid, unshackled from its current status as a so-called “natural monopoly.”

In short, an unlocked grid must adopt and harness the power of markets to incentivize individual users, linked to each other on a large scale, who change consumptive behavior in creative ways that drive efficiency and bring equity to use of the planet's finite and increasingly scarce resources.